Research facility construction

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Dennis P Brown
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Location: Glen Arm, MD

Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Sat Jun 20, 2020 4:17 pm

Well, finished the roof just in time. Started to rain as I did the last row of shingles. Nice compared to the earlier sunshine. Thunder started as I finished - luckily, computers track lighting and cells.

Tomorrow, I'll anchor the place and start on installing one of the two window assemblies. Then I plan on trenching and installing the 220/50 amp power line via std plastic piping.

Hopefully, I'll also Install the breaker box tomorrow.

I have a large LED light - so a ceiling will be up after these tasks tomorrow; hopefully, by next week I'll have all the wall insulation, and wiring installed with outlets/switches and have power/lights.
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20200620_114242.jpg
Shingles are done so I have a dry work area to use

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Bob Reite
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Bob Reite » Sun Jun 21, 2020 4:16 am

You still have that area above the door to get enclosed, as wind driven rain will still get inside at this point.
The more reactive the materials, the more spectacular the failures.
The testing isn't over until the prototype is destroyed.

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Sun Jun 21, 2020 9:30 am

You are correct but why I haven't yet covered those regions is that those are currently my best source of light for the interior. That is why I'm pushing so hard to install power and a light as well as one of the windows. I already have vinyl slats and wood panels to cover those openings as well as the side roof openings.

I will say that building this future 'research facility' is fun as far as doing something that is "science related". But till now I just didn't fully appreciated exactly how much finish work goes into building a remote house-like structure - like dry walling the ceiling and interior side walls nor about the heater/AC unit install much less the water - ugh. If it was to be a shed it would almost be done (except for your exact point.)

Update: Trenching done, 220 volt with its protective pipe enclosure installed. Grass reinstalled (lol.) Realize I need to paint the building before installing any windows or cutting/installing said power line through the wall, so that is next. Then window gets added; finally, anchors. If I am still able to move after cooking in the Sun, maybe start enclosing the roof areas. This research stuff was sure easier when I was a grad student and all I needed to do for experiments was get equipment, modify it and ready to go.

Next update: The building is painted and I added the first window. Working on the second one.
Attachments
20200621_134556.jpg
Detail of power line (220 v AC; 50 amp cable from house)
20200621_134544.jpg
Window on the south side for light and air flow (door is on north side.)

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Dennis P Brown
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Real name: Dennis P Brown
Location: Glen Arm, MD

Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Tue Jun 23, 2020 4:07 pm

Well, between heavy rain and high temps/humdity finished enclosure work; the vinyl siding was more work than I remember the last time I used that stuff.

Need to work on framing the ceiling so I can install the room LED light, wiring, and switch but too hot right now. Breaker box is installed and wired into the main cable that connects to my home breaker box. Taking a break ....

Took down outside scaffolding and here is the south side.
Attachments
20200623_165755.jpg
Southside; lower left side is the underground power cable in its housing entering the building
20200623_140633.jpg
Final window installed as well; small but does have a screen
20200623_120210.jpg
Research Facility exterior mostly complete; also need a door entry way platform

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Wed Jun 24, 2020 11:08 am

Much of the ceiling framing is done (think I'll add a small 'attic' and access for storage.) Now that nearly all major outside construction is finished my rapid pace needs to end (also, just too sore ;) ). So, from this point I will work much more slowly building the interior - wiring/outlets, water access, insulation, dry wall, floor tiling, painting and environmental (AC/heat) install (that is still a long list! Thought I was nearly done building ... oh well.)

The difference between a shed and a real Research 'building' (even if it is just a larger size than most sheds) are the facilities inside; and that means a lot of extra work.

Since these installs will be spread out over a number of weeks and until finished, I see no point in anymore progress photo's until I get these essential but 'secondary' jobs done (besides, a few other projects that were sidelined due to this project and still need my attention, now, need to be addressed. Not everyone is happy I spent so many hours the last week or so focused on this sole project.)

Besides, I look forward to seeing other peoples fascinating projects and results here!

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Tue Jun 30, 2020 5:37 pm

So after taking five days off I'm starting work on the interior of the facility. I've completed all wiring - including seven 120 v outlets, two ceiling light boxes and a two phase 220 volt outlet. Installed the LED lights with a switch so I have enough illumination in the room now to work. Next up is install the ceiling drywall panels (ugh) and start insulating all walls & ceiling; also (and this is really important since the building is a semi-hot box now, install the environmental system so I have AC!)
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20200630_132713.jpg
The main breaker pannel and wiring; below is the 220 v outlet

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Wed Jul 01, 2020 6:56 pm

Well, the worst part is done - installed the ceiling dry wall and its insulation. Still need to finish the attic entrance but that will be tomorrow. I dreaded this part of the install but the scaffolding made the job relatively straight forward. One of the LED lights gave me a minor issue but that I'll fix tomorrow (doesn't respond to the off position of the switch). The research facility is starting to look real.

Can't wait to finish and install all my equipment; I'm especially interested in re-starting my abandoned deuterium accelerator, besides the fusor. I hope to add a small desk/study area but this building isn't exactly spacious (about 110 sq. ft.) and I have even more experimental equipment besides those mentioned.
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20200701_144919.jpg
Dry wall ceiling in place and lights installed properly

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Richard Hull
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Richard Hull » Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:08 am

Back in 2014 I bought a "portable building". I my county, such a building cannot exceed 280 square feet. The local company utilizes a Pennsylvania Dutch contractor to make all their custom, portable buildings over 140 square feet. My building was 12X20, (240 sq ft), with a barn roof that I specified. Those folks used no chip board, only solid plywood, (floors, walls and roof). All studs on 18-inch centers. The runners are treated 8X8's and vinyl siding and 30 year architectural shingles. The local company that sold me the building also took down a section of my chain link fence, moved in the building next to my lab, leveled the building on blocks, re-installed the fence all of this plus the building for $3400.

I wired the building. I also took full advantage of the barn roof, by installing 2X6 beams spanning and linking the upper runners and roof joints. To these, in alternation, I spanned with wood to create 4 ceiling storage areas. These 2X6's give tremendous cross bracing strength to an already superbly built building. I added a free, new air conditioner that a neighbor bought but never installed.

I looked at the kits and pre-built offerings at the local Lowes and Home depot. All chip board, 24 inch centers, etc. I would not accept these standards as a child's play house construction. It was worth a little more to have it done correctly using the right materials.

I attach some images.

Richard Hull
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Shop#4.jpg
Shop#3.jpg
Shop#2.jpg
Shop#1.jpg
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Dennis P Brown
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Real name: Dennis P Brown
Location: Glen Arm, MD

Re: Research facility construction

Post by Dennis P Brown » Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:25 pm

That is one impressive build and very roomy. Craftmanship shows. A similar kit runs about $7.5 K (and no solid wood panels, of course), unassembled by the local major hardware store.

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Richard Hull
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Re: Research facility construction

Post by Richard Hull » Fri Jul 03, 2020 7:11 pm

I think that in 2014, I spent about an additional $400 on the interior. Notice I did not use wallboard but 1/2-inch plywood for interior walls. I spent less that $20 on all electrical work. I received about 100 old style fuses about 10 years ago. and a friend gave me an old fuse power box. I already had a lot of romex laying around. For lighting I just used ceiling mounted old Edison sockets and screwed in 60W equivalent white LED lamps.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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