Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

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Rex Allers
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Rex Allers » Tue Jun 25, 2019 10:36 am

Wow. I, at first, thought you were linking the GM counter manual.

All about neon lamps, 1966. Really cool, man. More than 100 pages. I'll have to digest it slowly.

One comment. I wish the guy that wrote the (pencil?) notes in it had better handwriting. Looks like good additions.

As for the Eveready reply. I don't want to get into, "Hey, you kids, get off my grass", mode, so I'll just let it pass.
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Rich Feldman
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Rich Feldman » Wed Jun 26, 2019 12:52 am

My first and only 90 volt battery was pretty old stock in about 1970.

Dad had taken me to J & H Outlet store in San Carlos. There we found all the parts
for a neon glow lamp blinker (relaxation oscillator) circuit in an already-old magazine or book.
Don't know if I've ever gotten an electric shock from a battery after that one.
Mike echo oscar whisky! I repeat! Mike echo oscar whisky, how do you copy? Over.

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Richard Hull
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Richard Hull » Wed Jun 26, 2019 9:10 am

Be glad you didn't stumble onto the 510 volt battery. It could supply a few milliamps! I laid eyes on a 510v batt in Batteries Plus. They have recessed, flat, silver-plated pad contacts. (see previous photo) When new, they are covered with a plastic insulating film. When placed into service, the battery door has a spring that forces the top of the battery into spike contacts in the photo flash battery holder. These pierced the film to make contact.

I have been shocked by the naked button contacts on the 90 volt jobs when a young boy...WOW!...DC is nasty. If you are at all sweaty the 67.5 volt battery will ring the old bell, too.

Richard Hull
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Richard Hull
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Richard Hull » Wed Jul 17, 2019 6:06 am

Finally!! It took a few weeks, but apparently Eveready had someone go down to the sub-basement nether regions to talk to the "old retainer" sitting at the slant top desk with his green head visor on. Eveready stopped production of a all stack cell carbon-zinc high voltage batteries in 2011. Now you know and can talk with authority on the demise of those old portable vacuum tube application batteries of yesteryear.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Mark Rowley
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Mark Rowley » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:42 pm

I’m a bit late on this thread but wanted to say that restoration of 1950’s geiger and scintillation detectors has been a years long hobby as well. Detectrons, PRI’s, RCA, Babbel, and Mt Sopris are just a few of my favorite detectors. Without disrupting the originality of the unit, i make it a point to assemble replacement power supplies to negate the use of unobtanium B batteries or the 22.5v versions.

The photo is just a small sampling of my PRI 111B stock. The YouTube link is a refurbished 1954 PRI 111 Scintillator which uses 2 D cells and four 9v’s to operate.

https://youtu.be/D4Nydiq10aE

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Richard Hull
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Richard Hull » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:21 am

Wow! Bill Kolb and I love those old precision "ray gun" scintillators!! Nice work. All of my restorations also use home built B battery eliminators. I have done several of the precision chrome plated GM restorations as well as some Nuclear Chicago GM counters and ion guns (ala cutie pie)

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Mark Rowley
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Mark Rowley » Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:00 am

Providing you have yet to see it, you may like this. It’s a 12 minute “commercial” made by PRI in 1955. It primarily focuses on the benefits of the “Ray Gun” Scintillator (aka 111/111B) with no shortage of action shots.

https://youtu.be/fCdB1Wdc5VI

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Richard Hull
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Richard Hull » Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:29 pm

Thanks for the URL. I have passed it on to Bill Kolb and others. A great little short promo film. I noticed three things.

1. I noticed the little tiny Crosley auto in the film. Rare and worth a fortune today.
2. The voice of the narrator was that of the man who introduced and gave demos at the beginning of every episode of Science Fiction theater 1955-57 TV show that I watched religiously as a young man.
3. Did you see the credits at the end of the film? Mc Gowan was the producer/director. Ever read the book “Uranium Fever or No Talk under a Million” by Raymond and Sam Taylor? Mc Gowan is the director from Warner Brothers who Raymond and Sam Taylor worked with through the bulk of the book to produce a feature length film about the U boom, which was a nightmare. Mc Gowan is portrayed as a nail biting, paranoid nervous Nellie who was freaking out constantly during the filming. The Montgomery fellow in the credits was also part of the film crew in the book.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Bob Reite
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Bob Reite » Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:13 am

I remember getting a PRI 111 in an Olson Electronics $5.00 "surprise box". Alas it was missing the PMT and the attached crystal, the most expensive parts. I don't recall what became of it, probably traded it or sold it at a hamfest ages ago.
The more reactive the materials, the more spectacular the failures.
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Mark Rowley
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Re: Cutting edge GM counter (1953)

Post by Mark Rowley » Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:38 am

Around 1998 / 1999 Allyn Goshy and a couple others obtained quite a few 111/111B units and refurbished them with battery eliminator supplies (Goshy being the most famous imo). Due to the scarcity of geiger counters in the public market coupled with the Y2K fear, I saw these being sold for $500-$1000 a piece. $500 may have been the price to send in an unrefurbished version for upgrading. Sales appeared to taper off around 2002 or 2003. Today, unrefurbished units tend to sell between $50 and $150.

I have several of the Goshy supplies and I have to complement him on his work. Hand wound transformers and personally designed circuitry. Something of a rarity these days.

The 111's are generally sought after by Star Trek prop collectors as they were featured in one or two episodes. Sadly though, when the prop folks get them they are quicky gutted like a trout and spray painted flat Krylon silver.

Mark Rowley

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