Apollo 11 and Farnsworth (and Brown)

Announcements and items of immediate importance.
Post Reply
User avatar
Paul_Schatzkin
Site Admin
Posts: 673
Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2001 4:49 pm
Real name: aka The Perfesser
Contact:

Apollo 11 and Farnsworth (and Brown)

Post by Paul_Schatzkin » Tue Jul 16, 2019 4:15 pm

Hey guys,

As the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 ramps up this week (today, July 16 is the anniversary of the launch; Saturday the 20th is the anniversary of the landing), I've posted the last chapter of my Farnsworth biography on Medium.com:

https://medium.com/@paulschatzkin/apoll ... d9c178f4b6

I also placed a new entry on the front page of fusor.net

As I re-read this material recently, I was struck by Farnsworths' vision that fusion would eventually be used to propel vehicles into space. He often used the "pineapple and the pea" analogy. In the current regime, using rockets (basically, "let's light a fire and go into space!), the launch vehicle is the size of a pineapple and the payload is the size of a pea. And most of the fuel in the launch vehicle is burned getting the rest of the fuel out of the atmosphere. Not a particularly efficient process.

Farnsworth predicted that with fusion at our disposal, those ratios could be reversed: A fusion-powered engine (?) the size of a pea could be able to lift a payload the size of a pineapple.

He also wondered "why do we think we need to spend so much energy to travel across something that is essentially nothing?"

All of that has me thinking about the nexus between the two books I've written, the Farnsworth biography and the (unfinished) Townsend Brown manuscript, i.e. "The Biography of Man Whose Story Cannot Be Told." I am recently beginning to ponder how these two stories might be of a piece...

Simply put: IF there is any validity to Townsend Brown's 'electrically generated artificial gravity' theories, then what that would require is a size-and-weight efficient source of megavolts - something that a device like the Fusor, if it were ever fully realized, would be able to produce.

So there are two unproven ideas that go well together. In the realm of the unproven, that is.

Townsend Brown dismissed even the best of modern rocketry as "brute force and awkward." When courting his future wife, he took her sailing on Buckeye Lake in Ohio, and told her that one day, space-traveling vessels would simply "push away from the Earth the way this boat pushed away from the dock...."

That sounds to me like what a pea-sized, fusion-powered, artificial gravity launch vehicle could do with a pineapple sized payload.

And once out of the earth's orbit, the same vessel would be able to warp time and space, thus crossing something that is essentially nothing.

Well, there's some wild-ass theories for you.

But that's what I'm thinking about as we observe the 50th anniversary of Man's first foot steps on some celestial object other than the Earth.

Thank you all for indulging me.

--PS
Paul Schatzkin, aka "The Perfesser" – Founder and Host of Fusor.net
Author of The Boy Who Invented Television - http://farnovision.com/book.html
"Fusion is not 20 years in the future; it is 50 years in the past and we missed it."

User avatar
Richard Hull
Moderator
Posts: 11415
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2001 1:44 pm
Real name: Richard Hull

Re: Apollo 11 and Farnsworth (and Brown)

Post by Richard Hull » Wed Jul 17, 2019 4:57 am

What holds us back is mass. With neutral matter, (mass), comes two characteristics we have yet to even fathom at a base level.
Mass creates gravity.(warps space-time) Thus far, gravity is only observed as a single attractive force. Also, with mass, comes inertia. There is no core understanding of this resistive single action characteristic of matter either.

This is not to say there are not a ton of theories that haven't or can't be tested to a scientific certainty to achieve a core level understanding of either.

These two characteristics are granted unto all mass. Thus, we require powerful rockets to get into space. Once free of earth, gravity is beaten, but inertia is still there any place in the universe. In the solar system, gravity is our pal as we have figured out how to steal momentum from orbiting planets via their gravitational attraction to accelerate or sling-shot craft around planets to huge velocities that would take tons of fuel that we can't launch. Still no free lunch as we change the orbital velocity of the planet by a few pico seconds forcing it to fall towards the sun by a fraction of a millimeter. This happens every time we steal gravitational energy from a planet to speed up one of our craft. Just real physics in action. We have not weakened or stolen any of the planets gravitation we used its gravity to steal a bit of the planet's orbital momentum. Momentum is a function of that strange characteristic of matter called Inertia.

Gravity is a form of potential energy as is simple magnetism. Inertia is a form of "anti-energy", (euphemism), and is merely a state of existence granted to all matter. In short, inertia is a strong and miraculous resisting force to a change in matter's motion.

Anti-gravity has a lot of proponents, but not one experimenter has had any result on a scale we can use.

For the foreseeable future, we will be burning a lot of rocket fuel plodding around our little solar system on manned missions.
Ion propulsion is coming on line for robotic multi-year missions of smaller probes.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

User avatar
Paul_Schatzkin
Site Admin
Posts: 673
Joined: Thu Jun 14, 2001 4:49 pm
Real name: aka The Perfesser
Contact:

Re: Apollo 11 and Farnsworth (and Brown)

Post by Paul_Schatzkin » Thu Jul 18, 2019 2:07 pm

"Anti-gravity has a lot of proponents, but not one experimenter has had any result on a scale we can use."

That we know of.

That has been publicly reported.

My "sources" in the Townsend Brown investigations tried to infer otherwise, with the added temptation that such information has been deliberately withheld by unknowable forces. "Too hot for humans..." was the implication.

But now we're halfway down the bottomless rabbit hole (how do you know if you're half way down if you don't even know if there is a bottom?) amid the uncertainty that there is even a rabbit.

Such is my "reality."

--P
Paul Schatzkin, aka "The Perfesser" – Founder and Host of Fusor.net
Author of The Boy Who Invented Television - http://farnovision.com/book.html
"Fusion is not 20 years in the future; it is 50 years in the past and we missed it."

Post Reply