Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis

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Richard Hull
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Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis

Post by Richard Hull » Wed Sep 26, 2007 3:36 pm

The above book by F.L. Annunziata is thoroughly modern in content. Published by Academic Press

The key word here is analysis.

This book goes into advanced college level details on radioactivity analysis techniques using older and modern detectors. It gives clear information about how to measure, sources of errors using various detectors, pitfalls, statistical data reduction and problems that may be encountered there.

It would be especially useful to the amateur radiomaterials collector who wants to know what is there and how much of it is there. This is no little intro work and stands outside of Knoll's work yet compliments it as the natural next step into the detailed, intelligent use of instrumentation and how to make sure you are not kidding yourself by misusing the gear or have made an error in gathering data and reducing the statisitics.

This work is about 800 pages long and is not for anyone but the serious officianado of radioactive detection and measurement.

I had to have it due to its depth and breadth and to complete parts of my library.

As it is a textbook level work by a superb scientific publisher, be prepared to pay $50.00+ used and well over $100.00 from a retail bookseller. I actually got mine for $41.09 +$4.00 shipping and consider myself very fortunate to have recieved it brand new from a seller that never sold it and was looking to dump it.

In its class, I give this one an AAA+

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Re: Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis

Post by Nanos » Wed Sep 26, 2007 5:50 pm

Does it mention about measuring neutrons ?

Particularly using a low cost approach, such as using Indium.

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Re: Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis

Post by Richard Hull » Wed Sep 26, 2007 7:39 pm

The book does go into activation product analysis, but not into how to activate. There are a lot of other books on neutron physics that cover the actual activation process.

The process of indium actiavtion is covered already in the radiation forum here in the past. You should not need a book in this particular scenario.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Re: Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis

Post by Nanos » Wed Sep 26, 2007 9:20 pm

The mention of it so far that I've seen has been very high level and misses a lot of the possible simple stuff that I'm unaware of.

For example, how big a piece of Indium should I be looking to use ?

Is larger surface area better than smaller ?
(Eg. if you wrapped a large thin sheet around the fusor, would that be a good thing or a bad thing ?)

What kind of thickness is ideal ?

A quick google doesn't bring much up at all that I could find out about using it, anyone recommend any URL's in particular ?

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Re: Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis

Post by Richard Hull » Thu Sep 27, 2007 2:54 pm

You must look at the type of radiation from activation. If a target is too thick, you will activate the guts of indium and never detect the beta radiation inside.

Most activations are of thin foils. Indium of a few mils thickness is adequate. The larger the surface area, the better, but that demands a concomitant massive neutron oven, (moderator).

The mass of the target has no bearing in fusor activation schemes as will be understood from the explanation below.

Little is to be gained by making a surface area larger than your detector head, especially when looking at low energy betas.

The fusor will not effectively activate long half-lived isotopes. This narrows the choices for targets greatly. Another factor that aces out targets is the neutron cross section of the element bombarded. Small cross section materials will not effectively activate.

Only good books on neutron physics will give good, detailed, comprehensive information. Check out the books and refs forum.

Ideally, For thermal activation, you would want three inches of moderator like wax or polyethylene between the neutron source and the activation target material with an INFINITE surrounding amount of moderator to the sides and rear. In practicality, you would want 3" all the way around the entire target with preferably more to the sides and rear.

Carl Willis has, in the past, posted a fantastic report on moderator slection, and thickness which I constantly reference but will not give, yet again, here.

Search for it.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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