Making My First Successful Film

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by Dennis P Brown » Fri May 19, 2017 12:32 pm

Acetone works very well with removing metal coatings from glass and even off of some metals like steel; do wear proper gloves and do it outside. While acetone isn't very toxic, it is best to minimize exposure. Do wear proper eye protective googles.

ian_krase
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by ian_krase » Fri May 19, 2017 7:35 pm

Interesting and not intuitive. How does it do that?

John Futter
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by John Futter » Fri May 19, 2017 9:47 pm

A proper sputtered film will not rub off with acetone or pull off with the scotch tape test
evaporated films may come off with either methods as mentioned above.
I clean our sputter system viewports @ work with aqua regia and if its being a bit slow i'll add some hydrogen peroxide to jazz it up
SEM techs use KOH solution to clean the apertures from tungsten deposits

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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by ian_krase » Sun May 21, 2017 1:58 am

And the KOH does not destroy the glass? Or etches it very slowly, while stripping tungsten quickly? What were you stripping with aqua regia?

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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by John Futter » Sun May 21, 2017 3:22 am

aqua regia strip for Ag, Au, Mg, Ca, Bi alloys various, ZnO As, Cu, Ti, Al,W, WO, Sb and Sb alloys, Fe, Ni, Te, Zr, Gd, Sc, Pb, S, C, B, BN, ITO,Co, Dy, Si, SiO, TiN,Na,K,, and a few more I cannot remember at the mo.
usually there are several differing layers on the pyrex viewports
KOH will not attack glass in the short term.
For layers that are highly resistant to the aqua regia I drop a couple of mls of 70% HF on top but you have to be carful as this does etch the viewport and you must neutralize the acid before removing from the solution otherwise the viewport will go opaque (Frost)

ian_krase
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by ian_krase » Sun May 21, 2017 10:40 pm

OK, interesting. Thank you. I guess I need some acid.

Silver films must come out as silver chloride particles, I assume.

Do you have any advice on how to handle this stuff on a small scale without needing immersion?

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by Dennis P Brown » Mon May 22, 2017 1:37 pm

Do realize HF (hydrofluoric acid) is an extremely powerful neurotoxin and at 70% or higher concentrations does not cause pain if it touches skin; it is bone seeking and a long-term chronic poison in such cases. It is very dangerous to breathe. Use only with proper equipment.

Mixing peroxide with acid has to be done carefully and the mix will heat up a great deal (depending on concentration, of course.) If you do that, do be careful and realize that the mix could splatter on its own; don't mix HF and peroxide except if using a vented hood and proper safety gear and after reading/learning proper use/safety first. HF is not a strong acid but extremely toxic to living creatures (so disposal is an issue.)

If you decide to get HF, here is a good paper on its dangers: https://web.utk.edu/~ehss/training/has.pdf

ian_krase
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by ian_krase » Mon May 22, 2017 7:41 pm

I've used HF before, but that was in a very well equipped university lab. Not going to do it with my current capabilities. It's just impossible. Maybe some of the fluoride-ion-containing consumer market glass etchants?

Roberto Ferrari
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by Roberto Ferrari » Mon May 22, 2017 9:16 pm

Hi
Tungsten deposits cleans well with molten sodium nitrite (NaNO2).
You can heat gently the other side of the window and place a few grains of the salt, that will melt easily. After the attack salts must be cleaned with warm water.
In case of windows in a metal-to-glass seal, heating can be risky. I would suggest to melt the sodium nitrite in a crucible and pick up a small quantity still molten and to rub the W deposit.

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Dennis P Brown
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Re: Making My First Successful Film

Post by Dennis P Brown » Tue May 23, 2017 9:23 am

fluoride-ion-containing consumer market glass etchants?
I believe (and anyone with knowledge, please weigh in) these are just more dilute HF solutions;which still poses a similar risk. If you decide to try one, read ALL the safety data they provide, use proper chemical googles, acid resistant gloves, and work in a well ventilated area; as a OSHA warning stated - if you think you have smelled HF, you haven't! And I am sorry to say, I know from personal experience that statement is 100% accurate ... .

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