Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

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Azygous
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Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Azygous » Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:44 am

Hi I read an article in popular science about a fusion reaction being triggered by a 1 mm size diamond bullet traveling 1000 km/s to shoot a 1 cm sized piece of crystal methane (Frozen Methane Gas). Has anyone read this article? Why not use a buckyball which has been submerged and frozen in methane. Then accelerate two or more of those and collide them in a reaction chamber instead? A buckyball has 2 times the strength of a diamond. As well as having superconducting properties as it nears zero Kalvin.

(Diamond Fusion Article) :
http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2 ... rchers-say

Solid Methane melts at 91K according to Wikipedia.

A c60 sphere probably achieves super conductivity around 38K but more likely in the 20 or below range.

Search 'CNT Black Hole' on Google News and there is an article posted by Harvard University researchers that show supercooled hydrogen atoms being accelerated at extreme rates unheard of previously. Using a well fitted tube of lined with conducting nanotubes (currently conducting electricity). Then this buckyball should be accelerated with extreme forces to its collision site.

(Harvard University Article) :
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 125716.htm

If the kinetic energy is present then a thermonuclear burn should be initiated in the collision chamber. Millions of buckyballs could be accelerated per second to the target zone so staining the reaction wouldn't be an issue because each collision has the ability to achieve fusion.

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Azygous » Mon Jul 19, 2010 9:27 am

(What are Fullerenes?)
http://www.photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/~maru ... t-icr.html

Possibly colliding:
c60 -c60,
c60-c70,
c70-c70 are each possible options.

There are two spheres that are made of carbon, Carbon 60 and Carbon 70 which both have the same sp2 bonds which are much stronger then the sp3 bonds which Diamonds have.

c70 may carry a better payload of frozen methane and have more mass. this should be considered as well.

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by dbrown » Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:39 am

Hi,
question - how do you plan on accelerating the buckyballs to 1000 km/s? They say they could use an accelerator ... that is going to cost a lot of energy and they just claim that their model says it will produce more energy than it costs. Such claims using models doesn't sound too promising without details of their assumptions.

Also, at these speeds the strength of a material has no effect on the outcome of the fusion (but is important on acceleration methods that can be used) but the charge of the atoms does - hence deuterium is better than carbon or hydrogen for fusion (most mass for least charge issues; tritium is used for similar reasons.) Why use carbon at all?

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Edward Miller » Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:09 pm

Hi Dustin,

Nice idea! I have a little team of scientists already working on this. It's called NanoFusion.

In terms of your original post we don't need to shoot ions of D+ at a target like deuterated methane because we can capture a neutral D2 molecule within the C60 itself and shoot that at a solid plate. We can actually get our D2@C60 molecule up to 120 keV with the Ionoptika C60-40 ion gun.

EDIT: We've also produced deuterated C60D44 (the outside is covered with deuterium). The problem is that the deuterium detaches upon heating within an ion beam.

There's more info and FAQ on our website http://carbonlabs.com

Ed Miller

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Chris Bradley » Mon Jul 19, 2010 5:33 pm

Already commented on:

viewtopic.php?f=15&t=7247#p49119

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Azygous » Mon Jul 19, 2010 8:52 pm

can you put supercooled fuel inside of a buckyball and then use the nanotubes to accelerate just two c60 spheres to collide? Did you check out the Harvard article I posted? I think it would be worth checking out. so far it accelerates hydrogen atoms. but I bet a tunnel surrounded like [[[[[[[[[[[[[[o] with nanotubes for each '[' one's on top, bottom, left and right. They would equally pull and then the nanotube current could be timed to turn on and off to accelerate multiple buckyballs simultaneously. I don't know how your ion gun works but it sounds too hot to make nuclear fusion. For some reason the colder the conditions are when the collision happens the more likely we are to achieve nuclear fusion. Almost seems like a paradox.

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Edward Miller » Mon Jul 19, 2010 10:11 pm

1. You don't need to collide C60 and C60. Everything you need for fusion is inside a single C60.
2. Nanotube experiments are very hard and thus expensive. Even our very simple fullerene experiments take a lot of time and money.
3. You don't need to use nanotubes to accelerate C60 since a beam would work.
4. You can turn the beam down as low as you want.
5. The deuterium itself doesn't need to be cool since it's trapped inside of a cage. The only time you need to have something supercool is when you're shooting something into a gas and trying to make it stick.
6. Yes there is a paradox with regard to density and temperature. Traditional fusion is done via high temperature thus thermonuclear fusion. There is another type of fusion called pycnonuclear meaning dense. Dense deuterium is very cool yet this isn't the same as cold fusion. A single molecule can get the effect of density by being inside of a molecular cage.

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Azygous » Fri Jul 23, 2010 5:05 am

Can you explain your process please, or link to article where your nanofusion is discussed? I really like that you replied to this does mine even sound plausible? Say you got two c60 40 ion beams and just shot them at each other would that work? Can some one please explain what the fuel needs to be? D-T molecule? D2 molecule? or just any regular old H2 that you get from electrolysis of h2o?

Is there anyway to make D or T instead of mine it? like using neutron decay to force other Hydrogen to become larger isotopes. Is that possible to build atoms sub atomically yet? I know they use zirconium rods in nuclear fission reactors to act as stabilizers and neutron absorption.

Thanks

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Edward Miller » Fri Jul 23, 2010 11:19 pm

You don't need to collide two objects since everything is in one container you can just work with that one container.

Imagine you want to fuse peanut butter and jelly. You could take the pb on one piece of bread and shoot it at another piece of bread with jelly from the opposite direction. Or you could mix the pb and jelly together and put them inside of a half sandwich.

I don't know if any of the papers I have would help much they're very technical.

You can buy D2 from gas suppliers. It naturally exists as a fraction of water. T is made in fission reactors.

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Re: Supercooled Buckyball Collisions

Post by Azygous » Sat Jul 24, 2010 6:29 am

You are 'Supercool' Edward Miller

Have you seen this article?

"In new research, materials scientists at Rice University have made the surprising discovery that tiny carbon capsules called buckyballs are so strong they can hold volumes of hydrogen nearly as dense as those at the center of Jupiter."-

http://www.nanitenews.com/research/Tiny ... upiter.asp

Thanks you are really smart, that explains the viability of hybrid fusion/fission reactors!

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