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Re: Where to find info on all possible fusion reactions(with reactants below below Fe).

Posted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 12:52 pm
by Captain_Proton
this should help...

Re: Where to find info on all possible fusion reactions(with reactants below below Fe).

Posted: Wed Aug 17, 2005 1:46 pm
by Richard Hull
Given the right accelerator, the right target, the right gases, the right collisions and a few other little interesting possible conditions there could be thousands of sub iron fusions, especially with low Z bullets like, protons, deuterons, helium, lithium, beryllium and boron atom bullets.

The table of the nuclides provided by Captain Proton shows just products. The energies needed to make some of those bizarre isotopes plus the fact that virtually all such reactions are endothermic is well hidden in the literature.

I would imagine you might never see such a table or listing with all the possible sub iron fussions, their energy to fuse, their cross sections, and whether they are endo or exo thermic ever assembled. There is very little impetus or need for such a table in the real world of science and technology, though I am sure some one could try and noodle out the reactions coupled with about a year of research in the best nuclear physics reference libraries of the world and still miss some.

Good luck on ever achieving this goal.

Richard Hull

Re: Where to find info on all possible fusion reactions(with reactants below below Fe).

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 5:39 am
by Verp
It might be a good idea to look at both sides of “Iron Mountain”. I think we might find useful fission reactions of isotopes heavier than iron, especially if we want unusual particles and isotopes in small, controllable amounts for uses other than energy production. I’ve also suggested that chemical ions could be handled in ways that allow for novel reactions that can’t be done in normal environments, perhaps using both negatively charged and positively charged central grids for manipulating positive and negative ions. I know that working with chemical or unusual atomic reactions for something other than direct energy production might sound antithetical to what a lot of us are trying to do, but such activity might just might generate new ideas that would help the “lets try to get past practical break-even” crowd if people are trying to get other types of electrostatic confinement devices to run more efficiently to produce byproducts other than energy more efficiently.

Rod

Re: Where to find info on all possible fusion reactions(with reactants below below Fe).

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 3:12 pm
by Richard Hull
Stable isotopes under iron produced by fusion directly would be very rare. Most likley, the bulk are decay products from fusions.

In general, only the lowest energy, endothermic reactions that are aneutronic might produce stable elemental isotopes. Of course, there are exceptions. Obviously all stable elemental isotopes below iron are the direct result of fusion, but it is more a matter of how many decay parent products did the final resultant stable isotope have to fall thorugh to be stable and how long it took to do that following the semenal parent fusion.

Naturally most of the instantly stable fusions are at the very low Z end of the spectrum. D, He3, He4, etc. Once a lot of neutrons get involved with matter, and the energy of fusion goes up, then the more likelihood is that you will have a radioactive byproduct that ultimately decays to something stable.

Fortunately, most lower Z (under iron) radioactive, fusion product isotopes "shake out" fast and have short (geological time span) half-lives. Many are under a month or two. A very few are in the million year class.

Richard Hull

Re: Where to find info on all possible fusion reactions(with reactants below below Fe).

Posted: Thu Aug 18, 2005 7:38 pm
by Verp
When I said “both sides of iron mountain”, I was simply suggesting that fusors might also be used in fission experiments with isotopes heavier than iron for making unusual isotopes and perhaps unusual particles. This would probably be for mostly experimental reasons, rather than practical energy production or for the commercial production of fission byproducts. If fission could be done at better than practical breakeven using electrostatic confinement, fusion would probably be the more practical option, using the same basic techniques! I’m just suggesting that experimenters might have a new tool for things other than fusion and that could expand our understanding of how to do electrostatic confinement.

Rod

Fission due to D bombardment?

Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2005 4:45 pm
by TBenson
This brings up a tangential question that has long plagued my mind...

Is it possible to bombard a high-Z material with a Deuteron and cause it to fission? Or is that something that only happens with neutrons?

I confess total ignorance on this question...

Re: Fission due to D bombardment?

Posted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 3:57 pm
by Brian McDermott
Yes, but the deuteron needs to have really high kinetic energy in order to do so. We're talking multi-MeV deuterons from a cyclotron or other accelerator.

Re: Fission due to D bombardment?

Posted: Mon Aug 22, 2005 7:53 pm
by Richard Hull
Yes, you can induce fissions in any fertile or fissionable element with just alphas or anything as long as it is energetic enough. Remember all of the items about 92 are just itchin' to come appart. Neutrons work so well due to their bulk chargeless nature. In general, fissionables like thermal neuts and fertiles like fast neuts.

Richard Hull