System on a chip

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Scott Fusare
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System on a chip

Post by Scott Fusare » Mon Nov 05, 2007 2:22 pm

All,

Have a look at the attached datasheet. It would appear that this puppy does everything! Of course, this is a "Advanced Information Sheet" which translates to "it's not in production yet". The other downside will likely be the need for a bilateral non-disclosure agreement before they will even send complete info. I will be inquiring about an engineering sample just to see what comes of it.


Scott
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Richard Hull
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Re: System on a chip

Post by Richard Hull » Mon Nov 05, 2007 5:41 pm

Thanks for posting this "dream chip", Scott. One day maybe it will be put onto silly-con.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Scott Fusare
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Re: System on a chip

Post by Scott Fusare » Wed Nov 14, 2007 3:12 pm

I finally received a response on this part. They allege that the part is currently in the alpha testing stage and scheduled to enter beta early next year. Engineering samples are expected to be available sometime1st quarter 08. Single part prices projected in the ~$100 range. In speaking with an acquaintance from LANL, I have learned that these folks are real but under funded and moving very slowly. So, as Richard says, maybe someday.



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Re: System on a chip

Post by MSimon » Fri Nov 16, 2007 9:16 am

The 8051 is not a bad chip.

The multiplier on it speeds things up.

Division needs to be done in software. Which is not bad because if you are clever you need never do a divide in real time.

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Re: System on a chip

Post by Edward Miller » Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:06 am

Is there any update on this chip? I looked on the www.Telesensors.com website but it didn't see any pricing/order info yet.

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Richard Hull
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Re: System on a chip

Post by Richard Hull » Fri Sep 12, 2008 2:25 pm

Some of these pre-announcement data sheets are "licked finger" wind testers. If interest is high and remains high for a few months the chip might see production. If, however there are few inquiries and no follow-ups in ensuing months, the idea may never see implimentation.

Short runs of a product will be very, very expensive and gear designed with the chip might not be repairable just a few years later as there is no stock of a key IC that saw only a single run.

The quantity of specialized chips is growing each year and obsolete is the watch word for all but the most successful designs. This usually means that the least application-specific chips are the winners and long lived components.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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Re: System on a chip

Post by Starfire » Fri Sep 12, 2008 7:37 pm

There is a lot of software out there for the 8051 - an 8080 based device. This platform is produced in many configurations and by many manufacturers but this is a very interesting proposition to integrally couple an ADC onboard to a standard die - " nice one " Scott, I look forward to sampling this device. That said - it is a few years since I played with a 8051, which like myself, has a long pedigree.

Larry Upjohn
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Re: System on a chip

Post by Larry Upjohn » Fri Sep 12, 2008 9:53 pm

The idea of an all in one chip MCA was very appealing to me as well. However, I agree with Richard on the low production specialized silicon that is proprietary. My Tektronics O-Scopes have these specialized chips (IBM is also famous for this) that virtually obsolete good functional equipment as soon as the factory stops supporting these model lines.

MCA wise I discovered this MCA in a local surplus electronics dealer( Picture attached). Was able to round up the manual and software as well and have found that when properly configured is fully functional. Will attempt to get a screen shot of the computer CRT. Need a Co60 source to calibrate my NaI detector but otherwise I am pleased with my $75.00 investment. Larry Upjohn.
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Re: System on a chip

Post by bpaddock » Sat Sep 13, 2008 12:34 am

John Hendron wrote:
> There is a lot of software out there for the 8051 - an 8080 based device.

8048 was the parent of the 8051.

"This platform is produced in many configurations and by many manufacturers but this is a very interesting proposition to integrally couple an ADC onboard to a standard die - "

https://www.silabs.com/products/mcu/low ... fault.aspx

Runs down to 0.9V with 10-bit 300 kps ADC.

Look at Actel http://www.actel.com/
parts if your worried about radiation causing
single event upsets. They have 8051 and ARM cores.

http://www.actel.com/documents/FirmErrorPib.pdf

Bob Paddock

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Re: System on a chip

Post by Richard Hull » Mon Sep 15, 2008 4:25 pm

I actually did extensive robotic design work with the 8748 in the 80's (uv eraseable eprom version of the 8048. I did all the work on an apple II which had extensive developmental software and hardware support for the 40 pin DIP chip.

Today I prefer the parallax (PIC) based basic stamp for quick and dirty little jobs. It is currently a balance of external intelligent hardware and full computer software in getting scientific data collected. However, for all but the most speed intensive activities, PC software, alone, is doing the bulk of the data collecting and reduction.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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