Glow in the dark paint

This forum is for specialized infomation important to the construction and safe operation of the high voltage electrical supplies and related circuitry needed for fusor operation.
Post Reply
Jake Wells
Posts: 87
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2014 1:29 am
Real name: Jake Wells

Glow in the dark paint

Post by Jake Wells » Mon Nov 03, 2014 4:24 am

I doing a project involving a CRT from a television set. I have a vacuum chamber. I wish to bend the electrons using electro magnets. I wish to detect electrons with a phosphor screen but i dont have one.
Would Rustoleum Glow In The Dark paint glow if bombarded by electrons?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaJeLafvdBw
“The day science begins to study non-physical phenomena, it will make more progress in one decade than in all the previous centuries of its existence.”
― Nikola Tesla

User avatar
Carl Willis
Posts: 2841
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2001 11:33 pm
Real name: Carl Willis
Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
Contact:

Re: Glow in the dark paint

Post by Carl Willis » Mon Nov 03, 2014 5:53 am

I think a better place for this topic is in the Radiation Detection forum.

Some luminous paints are made with scintillating materials like ZnS. Cheap glow-in-the-dark paint from a hobby store is almost always ZnS in my experience, and so is a decent scintillator for electrons. Unfortunately, this paint's phosphor has dopants that give it a long decay time, unlike TV screen phosphors. The result is that less light is emitted promptly after the energizing event, and more light is emitted over many minutes afterward. Obviously this works well for glow-in-the-dark paint but is not a great property for an electron detector or TV screen. The other problem with paint is that it outgasses horribly in a vacuum. So if you want to direct a beam of electrons on it in an evacuated chamber, you will have to contend with a high gas load. TV screens are painted in a way that avoids gassy substances.

-Carl
Carl Willis
http://carlwillis.wordpress.com/
TEL: +1-505-412-3277

John Futter
Posts: 1582
Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2004 2:29 am
Real name: John Futter
Contact:

Re: Glow in the dark paint

Post by John Futter » Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:50 am

Buy some TEM screen re-coating phosphor
usually ZnS: Ag or ZnSe :Ag the Ag is the dopant
usual colour a nice blue or green

Ted Pella or similar will have it

User avatar
Rich Feldman
Posts: 1286
Joined: Mon Dec 21, 2009 11:59 pm
Real name: Rich Feldman
Location: Santa Clara County, CA, USA

Re: Glow in the dark paint

Post by Rich Feldman » Mon Nov 03, 2014 7:35 pm

I hope you try the GID paint and tell us what happens.

What worked for me was white powder brushed from the inside of a T12 fluorescent lamp.
Made into a slurry with water and left to dry in the bottom of an Erlenmeyer flask.
The layer is very poorly bonded, and can be blown off if the "CRT" is brought up to air too quickly.

With that and a rotary vane pump, in a high school classroom,
we observed magnetic deflection of beam from a primitive cold-cathode e-gun.
Got the idea here: http://www.sparkbangbuzz.com/crt/crt6.htm
The author says he made CRT's because "they emit a very intense fun field".
Sounds like lots of amateur scientists on this forum. :-)

You might also try a shard from a broken fluorecent lamp.
Or a broken, uh, CRT. Reminds me of this series by Jeri Ellsworth.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeriellsw ... otostream/
All models are wrong; some models are useful. -- George Box

User avatar
Richard Hull
Moderator
Posts: 12081
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2001 1:44 pm
Real name: Richard Hull

Re: Glow in the dark paint

Post by Richard Hull » Tue Nov 04, 2014 5:49 am

Fluorescent goodie in most tubes is an activated Calcium Tungstate.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

George Schmermund
Posts: 262
Joined: Wed Aug 16, 2006 12:51 am
Real name: George Schmermund
Location: Carlsbad, CA

Re: Glow in the dark paint

Post by George Schmermund » Tue Nov 04, 2014 6:03 pm

Anything obvious in high vacuum is probably wrong.

Post Reply