Power supply.

This forum is for specialized infomation important to the construction and safe operation of the high voltage electrical supplies and related circuitry needed for fusor operation.
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Jgn1
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Power supply.

Post by Jgn1 » Fri Jul 06, 2012 1:00 am

Hello,

After wandering around ebay for ages, I finally managed to find an x-ray transformer. I already bought it. (output: 60kV (Ampl.) at 7 mA DC). Now I'm looking for a suitable power supply, but I have failed to find one. I'm starting to get desperated.

I have found something like this:

http://www.ebay.de/itm/100kV-DC-high-vo ... _846wt_991

But I'm not sure if this will be usable for the fusor. Any suggestions?

David D Speck MD
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Re: Power supply.

Post by David D Speck MD » Fri Jul 06, 2012 2:46 am

This device is basically an auto induction coil. It is not suitable for fusor power -- just too little current output. Way overpriced for what's in the box.

Check the FAQs on this forum. There are many descriptions of successful fusor power supplies.

Dave

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Chris Bradley
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Chris Bradley » Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:23 am

Juan Robalino wrote:
> I finally managed to find an x-ray transformer. I already bought it. (output: 60kV (Ampl.) at 7 mA DC). Now I'm looking for a suitable power supply
If it is an ironed core transformer, your power supply will be a wall socket.

If it is a ferrite core then you'll have to get to grips with building electronic circuits. I'm not aware of suitable 'power supplies' capable of feeding a 400W ferrite transformer that you can buy - the transformer is usually part *of* the power supply!

Jgn1
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Jgn1 » Fri Jul 06, 2012 4:54 pm

Thanks for the info again!

@Chris: here I have atached the ebay page of the Transformer. There you may see two pics of it:

http://www.ebay.de/itm/150850301260?ssP ... _609wt_991

Tyler Christensen
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Tyler Christensen » Fri Jul 06, 2012 4:58 pm

That looks like a wound bobbin with no core, relatively useless unless you can find an appropriate core to put into it.

Jgn1
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Jgn1 » Fri Jul 06, 2012 5:48 pm

Hello Tyler,

You are scaring me Tyler. Core? Hm, for example?

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Chris Bradley
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Chris Bradley » Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:06 pm

Juan,

Sorry, but there is a steep learning curve ahead of you if you are aiming to piece together your own power supply.

Here is a link to one of the most detailed step-by-step build of a psu I've come across. Worth studying in depth ..... getting to understand why and how each component is used in this build is the trajectory of that learning curve.

http://w5jgv.com/hv-ps1/

(In case w5jgv comes through this part of the internet - thanks for the effort of preparing this!)

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Re: Power supply.

Post by Tyler Christensen » Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:13 pm

If you don't know what a transformer core is, you should do a lot of studying before you even think about powering up an x-ray transformer. It's for your own safety as well as those around you that you learn the fundamentals before working with such dangerous things.

Jgn1
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Jgn1 » Fri Jul 06, 2012 6:41 pm

Thanks for the advice - I'll dedicate now to that.

Very nice link Chris, thanks!

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Richard Hull
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Re: Power supply.

Post by Richard Hull » Mon Jul 09, 2012 5:41 pm

Tyler and other are right! If you are to commit to a fusor then you must commit to a lot of reading and pro-active self teaching in most of the major technological disciplines that are touched upon in the effort to doing fusion.

This is the attraction for many and also what keeps many casually interested people form doing fusion. The learning curve is steep. A lot of good money can be ill spent without a bit of fore knowldge.

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

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