GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

This forum is for specialized infomation important to the construction and safe operation of the high voltage electrical supplies and related circuitry needed for fusor operation.
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Steven Sesselmann
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GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:51 pm

Hi Guys,

GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE RESEARCH:  Model RR200 1.5N.
I have been offered one of these units relatively cheap.

Does anyone know this unit and is it suitable for use as a Fusor input
piower source.

Steven
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Q
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Q » Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:56 pm

well, i am not familure with this unit, so i cant say if it will make a good fusor supply. but if it is at a good price, i'd say go ahead and get it. i'm sure there are plenty of other expiriments that you could use that for. (assuming that you are knowlegable about high voltage safety, of course)

Q

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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by winterhaven » Fri Feb 24, 2006 10:59 pm

What's the voltage and amperage rating?

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Brian McDermott
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Brian McDermott » Fri Feb 24, 2006 11:07 pm

Assuming the "200" means 200kV and the 1.5 means "1.5mA," I'd say take it. The "N" in the part number means negative polarity, so that's good too.

1.5mA is probably too low for a fusor, but if I were offered a 200kV supply with those capabilities, I'd take it. There are plenty of other experiments you can perform with such a device.

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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Richard Hester » Fri Feb 24, 2006 11:20 pm

It's also instructive to calculate the stray capacitance needed at 200kV in order to store 10J, which will kill you if it hits you just right. C = 2E/V^2, where E is the stored energy, and V is the charging voltage. The capacitance for 10J is 500pF - not a lot. Of course, a smaller capacitance (say, 50pF) charged to this voltage will knock the living daylights out of you. This sort of voltage will also charge up nearby conductive objects to dangerous potentials, as Richard Hull mentioned a few years ago (he found out the hard way). If you get this beast, it should be housed in a grounded screen cage in oder to avoid unpleasant/fatal surprises.

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Fri Feb 24, 2006 11:26 pm

Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate the safety hints too. If this power
supply is rated for 200KV and 1.5 ma., does that mean that it would provide
higher amps at lower voltages or is the power output constant at 1.5 ma.?

Steven
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Brian McDermott
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Brian McDermott » Fri Feb 24, 2006 11:40 pm

1.5mA is the maximum it will supply at any voltage.

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Sat Feb 25, 2006 12:55 am

Thanks Brian, that might be a bit low, I thought I would be able to draw
more at lower voltages. Allthough, my Fusor design won't draw as many
amps as the standard Fusor model, as it does not have a grid in the
traditional sense. Still, I would not want to be limited to 1.5 ma. So, I think I
will give this unit a miss, and wait for a unit with a bit more power.

I have a questiuon about safety. In these split power units, would it be
adequate to build a Faraday cage around the voltage doubler and the
Fusor, and to have the controller outside the cage?

Is there any danger of electrocution when operating the control unit?

Steven
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Wilfried Heil » Sat Feb 25, 2006 2:09 am

You can tap the HV multiplier at a lower stage, where it will output proportionally more current, and disable (jumper) the rest. Say 50kV at 6 mA or 25kV at 12 mA. That´s not what is was designed for, but it will do, if needed.

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Steven Sesselmann
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Re: GAMMA HIGH VOLTAGE

Post by Steven Sesselmann » Sat Feb 25, 2006 2:52 am

Does anyone else have experience with this?

How would this work with the controller, would I just have to double the
amp reading?

Steven
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