Is JB Weld High-Vacuum Safe?

Every fusor and fusion system seems to need a vacuum. This area is for detailed discussion of vacuum systems, materials, gauging, etc. related to fusor or fusion research.
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Ryan Atkinson
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Is JB Weld High-Vacuum Safe?

Post by Ryan Atkinson » Sun May 12, 2013 1:57 am

I believe I've heard of JB weld and similar epoxies being used in high-vacuum environments for lower quality fusors and cyclotrons. Personally, I see a major offgassing problem with this. Does anyone know if it could hold up to the task, just for use in a bare-bones fusor or for other high-vacuum equipment? Thanks!

-Ryan
You are now aware of your breathing.

John Futter
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Re: Is JB Weld High-Vacuum Safe?

Post by John Futter » Sun May 12, 2013 7:45 am

Ryan
Read this forum
there is plenty of info

RobertTubbs
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Re: Is JB Weld High-Vacuum Safe?

Post by RobertTubbs » Tue May 14, 2013 6:36 am

Yes.

Jeroen Vriesman
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Re: Is JB Weld High-Vacuum Safe?

Post by Jeroen Vriesman » Thu May 16, 2013 1:37 pm

Nasa has an outgassing database:

http://outgassing.nasa.gov/index.cgi
Go to search and just type "JB weld" in the box.

What is also important is the high temperature it can handle, it means you can do some bake-out.
Curing temperature, material thickness and surface area exposed to the vacuum is also important.

I have used "Hysol 9497", cured for one hour at 100 deg.C and then used it in vacuum (bake-out at 100 deg. C for 2 hours), no problem reaching < 1E-5 mbar.

Ryan Atkinson
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Re: Is JB Weld High-Vacuum Safe?

Post by Ryan Atkinson » Sun May 26, 2013 4:59 pm

Jeroen Vriesman wrote:Nasa has an outgassing database:

http://outgassing.nasa.gov/index.cgi
Go to search and just type "JB weld" in the box.

What is also important is the high temperature it can handle, it means you can do some bake-out.
Curing temperature, material thickness and surface area exposed to the vacuum is also important.

I have used "Hysol 9497", cured for one hour at 100 deg.C and then used it in vacuum (bake-out at 100 deg. C for 2 hours), no problem reaching < 1E-5 mbar.
Thanks, this was very helpful.

-Ryan
You are now aware of your breathing.

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