Supplies List

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Miles Hawley
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Real name: Miles Hawley

Supplies List

Post by Miles Hawley » Wed May 16, 2018 2:22 am

Hello Everybody,

Below is a PDF for my supplies list. The list is really just to see what else I need, or if I have everything. Anybody who is willing to look over it, and tell me if i'm missing anything, would be great. By the way the list would be for a basic fusor that does perform real fusion.
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Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Reactor Supplies List.pdf
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Miles Hawley
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Real name: Miles Hawley

Re: Supplies List

Post by Miles Hawley » Wed May 16, 2018 2:35 am

The first list isn't actually complete, I forgot to add in a radiation detection part, so the PDF below is the most recent one. Any feedback is appreciated.

-Miles
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Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Reactor Supplies List (4).pdf
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Richard Hull
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Re: Supplies List

Post by Richard Hull » Wed May 16, 2018 3:58 am

That is a great list and virtually complete. Now, do you have the $15,000 to get all that stuff, or the time and knowledge to collect most of it via surplus in good working order over 4 years for a bit over $2000?

Richard Hull
Progress may have been a good thing once, but it just went on too long. - Yogi Berra
Fusion is the energy of the future....and it always will be
Retired now...Doing only what I want and not what I should...every day is a saturday.

Miles Hawley
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Real name: Miles Hawley

Re: Supplies List

Post by Miles Hawley » Wed May 16, 2018 4:36 am

Probably not, on the money front, but I do have the time. If there is anything on that list that may not be needed for a basic fusor, could you let me know.

-Miles

Rex Allers
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Re: Supplies List

Post by Rex Allers » Wed May 16, 2018 5:46 am

On the vacuum side, I didn't see a backing vacuum pump in the list. This must bring down to a level of vacuum so the diff pump or turbo can work. Usually this is a rotary pump, either direct drive or belt drive.
Rex Allers

Miles Hawley
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Real name: Miles Hawley

Re: Supplies List

Post by Miles Hawley » Wed May 16, 2018 5:52 am

Thank you Rex for that information, ill make sure to add it to the list.

-Miles

Michael Bretti
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Re: Supplies List

Post by Michael Bretti » Wed May 16, 2018 3:57 pm

Miles,

This is a good top level list for supplies and the general categories needed to be covered. However, be aware that when you actually start breaking down the parts list for everything needed, you will be adding many, many items, and all of those small things add up in cost too. Bolts, nuts, hardware, copper gaskets, o-rings, roughing pump oil, diff pump oil (if using a diff pump), etc. These all add up in price. If you don't have the money to accomplish this right away, then time and resourcefulness will be crucial to your success - use it well. It appears all too often that new members charge in blindly, trying to rush to build a system as fast as possible to claim fusion, and never take the time to understand anything about vacuum systems, or working to optimize their system and fully plan everything out.

Take your time. Do complete and thorough research. Read everything you can on these forums, as well as elsewhere online. Get old used library textbooks on vacuum engineering technology (I have bought many excellent books on the subject for only a few dollars each.) Plan out your system. If you can, try to calculate parameters of your vacuum system so you better understand what to expect and what is going on with your design. Spend hours constantly searching ebay and other surplus suppliers. If you have time, I would recommend learning CAD - I use fusion 360, and it has been crucial to my planning, and has saved a huge amount of time and money. Just in the past few nights I have been CADing the stand for my primary 2.75" conflat system, as well as another 6" conflat system I will be using for ion engine testing, and have come up with a combined, dual system topology that will save at least another $2k based on the CAD designing and planning (I will be sharing this soon on another forum post). Start working out a complete parts and budget list. Analyze your cost savings and see how you can maximize it.

Take notes, and keep documentation on everything you do. There are more than enough resources available freely to design and build a highly engineered research grade system, if you take the time to learn and use your resources to their fullest potential. Richard Hull is spot on with his cost example - this is almost the same exact level in actual cost vs. cost savings I have seen for my own system. This is not a cheap hobby, and for most people with limited financial resources it is a work in progress over several years. However, if you plan well and are resourceful, for the cost of a good quality new laptop, or other "normal" consumer electronics, you could have a fully functioning, fusion research system that would normally cost tens of thousands of dollars to build.

Miles Hawley
Posts: 14
Joined: Sun May 13, 2018 7:32 pm
Real name: Miles Hawley

Re: Supplies List

Post by Miles Hawley » Wed May 16, 2018 8:29 pm

Michael,

I really appreciate you taking the time to right a response, I found everything very resourceful and interesting. I am planning my system out, and working on the cost of the system. The purpose of the list was just to see what the main basic components are, now that I see what the basics for a fusion are, I will be searching for the parts. On another note, are there any parts on the list that may not be needed for fusion, mind you that this will be to simply show fusion, and not to expand on research (that will be for the future).

-Miles

Michael Bretti
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Re: Supplies List

Post by Michael Bretti » Wed May 16, 2018 9:02 pm

Miles,

No problem, I have worked with and continue to work with many students and student groups, and am always willing to provide any advice and assistance for engineering projects for serious endeavors. You will find the wealth of knowledge here on the forums is immense, and you can get even more out of it by doing research and preparing yourself. No one will hold your hand through the process, but assistance will always be offered for those who are serious and take the effort to learn themselves.

Your initial list covers all the major items needed for a working fusion based system in general. A foreline trap is not required, but is something I would still recommend looking into if you want to keep your pump oils clean from cross-contamination from a roughing pump to diffusion pump, or even having roughing pump vapor migrating back to the inlet of whatever high vacuum pump you use. I bought mine used off eBay for around $80.00 - had to clean it a bit, but it was in great condition otherwise. It is an FL20k replaceable sorbent trap, with kf25 flanges. I have seen a bunch of these floating around ebay recently. Zeolite trap fill was purchased from LDS Vacuum for about $20 for a pound of zeolite pellets, more than enough to last you quite a while. Protection is two ways - helps absorb water vapor pumped from high vacuum side keeping the roughing oil clean, and keeps the diff pump oil clean from backstreamed roughing oil. Again, not critical or necessary at all for fusion, but something to consider.

The good news is, once you get fusion, that opens the door to a whole range of experiments. Many people seem like they want to do it to just achieve it, then drop it after. It is really only the beginning. Once you have the system running, you can optimize it, improve it, and really start running more advanced experiments. Neutrons are only the start, not the end, and are powerful tools themselves. To be honest, getting neutrons is very easy with a fusor if you have all the correct essential ingredients - it is using them effectively and optimizing your system that is the challenging and fun part.

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